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Tips for Successful Probation and What to Do When Probation Ends

Tips for successfully completing probation

  1. Keep in contact with your probation officer
  2. Do your best to stay employed
  3. Participate in required substance
  4. abuse treatment
  5. Make payment of all fines and fees
  6. assessed against you
  7. Don't be afraid to keep your
  8. probation officer informed if you
  9. cannot make required payments
  10. Do not commit any crimes
    • Even being charged with a crime can result in your violation of probation
    • A person with a felony conviction faces a mandatory prison sentence for their second conviction

Earned time credit

Persons on probation can earn an early release from probation. To earn early release, a person must make monthly payments, complete community restitution hours, and make progress toward case plan goals.

Getting an undesignated class 6 felony reduced to a misdemeanor

If you were convicted of a crime that was a class 6 felony that was left "undesignated" you can have that reduced to a misdemeanor if you successfully complete probation.

Having an undesignated class 6 felony reduced to a misdemeanor is not automatic.

You must file a motion, which is a request to a judge to have the felony conviction redesignated to a misdemeanor.

Ask your probation officer about having your first felony conviction vacated and your class 6 undesignated felony reduced to a misdemeanor when you are released from probation. You can also contact the attorney who represented you for help with a request to have your felony reduced to a misdemeanor.

Forms to restore civil rights and have class 6 undesignated felonies reduced to misdemeanors can be found at the Maricopa County Clerk's Office Self-Service Center.

Civil rights suspended due to a felony conviction

  • The right to vote
  • The right to hold public office
  • The right to serve as a juror
  • Rights affecting security at prison facilities
  • The right to possess a gun or firearm

Restoration of civil rights

The civil rights of first time felony offenders, except for the right to possess weapons, are

automatically restored if the person completes their term of probation or receives an absolute discharge from imprisonment and pays any fine or restitution imposed.

A person who has been convicted of two or more felonies must request that their civil rights be restored by the judge who discharged him or her from probation.

A person who has been convicted of.two or more felonies and who was sentenced to prison may have his or her civil rights restored by the judge who sentenced that person .

This request may not be made until at least two years from the date of their absolute discharge from imprisonment.

Restoration of the right to possess a gun or firearm

A person convicted of a "dangerous offense" may not request restoration of the right to possess or carry a gun or firearm.

A person convicted of a "serious offense" may not request restoration of the right to possess or carry a gun or firearm for ten years from the date of discharge from probation .

A person convicted of any other felony offense may not file for the restoration of the right to possess or carry a gun or firearm for two years from the date of the person's discharge from probation.

To learn more about how a Phoenix criminal defense attorney can help you, please contact the firm today.

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